ALECC

Association for Literature, Environment, and Culture in Canada / Association pour la littérature, l'environnement et la culture au Canada

Calls Archive


Past calls are posted here for reference – the most recent at the top of the page

ASLE Biennial Conference with LAND2, Sheffield, 6-8 September 2017.

Deadline: 15 March 2017

Rust/Resistance: Works of Recovery – 12th ASLE Biennial Conference, June 20-24, 2017 at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan

Deadline: 12 December 2016

4th Annual Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, June 3–9, 2017

Rolling deadline until February 15, 2017 until spaces are filled

Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society (LUCAS) International Graduate Conference 2017, 26 and 27 January 2017, The Netherlands

Deadline: 1 October 2016

2016 ASLE Translation Grants

Deadline: July 1st, 2016

3rd Annual Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference, Vermont, June 3-9, 2016

Rolling application deadline

Call for chapters for Transecology: Transgender Perspectives on the Environment

Abstracts due May 15, 2016

Who Do They Think They Are? Cultures of Climate Scepticism, Anti-Environmentalism, and Conservative Environmentalism Symposium

Proposals Deadline: April 8th, 2016

A Change of (s)cene: Reviewing our place in a new geological epoch

Deadline: March 31st, 2016

Call for Proposals (essays) : Perma/Culture: Imagining Alternatives in an Age of Crisis

Deadline for essays: February 1st, 2016

Maladies of the Soul, Emotion, Affect: Indigenous, Canadian, and Québécois Writings in the Crossfire of a New Turn

Deadline: February 1st, 2016

Call for Book Nominations: Alanna Bondar Memorial Book Prize

Deadline: January 15th, 2016.

Call for Papers: Humanities Journal: Special Issue “Energy Use and the Humanities”

Deadline: January 15th, 2016.

2016 Climate Fiction Short Story Contest: Arizona State University’ Imagination and Climate Futures Initiative

Deadline: January 15th, 2016.

Call for Papers: Embodied Readings: Child Readers and Children in Literature

Deadline for abstracts: 9th November, 2015

Making Common Causes: Crises, Conflict, Creation, Conversation

ALECC Biennial Conference — Call for Papers, Panels, and Other Presentations
June 15-18, 2016, Queen’s University, Kingston ON

Deadline Extended: September 20th, 2015 —– See the full call.

Call for Texts: 4elements Living Arts: Elemental Festival Call for Short Prose & Creative Non-­Fiction

Mnidoo Mnising | Manitoulin Island, First Annual Site-specific Elemental Festival, October 2nd-­4th, 2015

Deadline for all submissions: September 15th, 2015 at 5pm —– See the full call.

Call for Papers: International Symposium on Ecopoetics, Ekphrasis and Gary Snyder Studies

Abstracts due: September 10th, 2015 —– See the full call.

Passé, présent et avenir de l’écocritique québécoise et franco-canadienne

Les 8 et 9 octobre 2015, Montréal, UQÀM et Université McGill

Date limite : le 17 août 2015 —– Lire l’appel au complet.

Panel CFP: Media, Ecology, and New Materialism

SCMS Annual Conference 2016 Panel Proposal (Atlanta, March 30th – April 3rd, 2016)

Deadline: August 5th, 2015 —– See the full call.

 

Kudzu Quarterly – Call for Proposals – Teaching Green Humanities and Ecocriticism – Due June 1, 2015

from Alison Lacivita : “Hey friends, I’m Guest Editing an issue of the awesome new journal, Kudzu Quarterly, on Teaching Green Humanities and Ecocriticism. (Essay Cluster Theme: Teaching Green Humanities and Ecocriticism) For our autumnal scholarly issue, we are interested in papers exploring pedagogical approaches to teaching sustainability, ecopoetics, ecocriticsm, and greening the humanities. Submit proposals to me or to editor@kudzuhouse.org. Proposals should be at least 500 words. Please also send a CV! Due by June 1, 2015. http://quarterly.kudzuhouse.org/submit.html

 

Call for Papers: Fluid Currents: Water, Art, and Ecology – Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC), Pittsburgh, PA, October 21-24, 2015 – April 20, 2015 Deadline

Session chairs: Nenette Luarca-Shoaf, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Minnesota and Laura Turner Igoe, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton University Art Museum

In his 1836 “Essay on American Scenery,” the painter Thomas Cole compared water to “the eye of human countenance….in the unrippled lake, which mirrors all surrounding objects, we have the expression of tranquility and peace—in the rapid stream, the headlong cataract, that of turbulence and impetuosity.” Inspired by SECAC’s 2015 host city of Pittsburgh, located at the confluence of three rivers, this panel seeks proposals for papers that consider how water, art, and ecology have intersected and informed each other throughout history. How have artists visually and materially imagined water conduits—whether rivers, streams, waterfalls, canals, or even underground pipes—and their relationship with human and/or nonhuman life? By what means have artists explored and celebrated the dynamic quality of waterways, documented their development and change over time, or condemned their failure, pollution, and misuse? Does the study of artistic engagement with bodies of water challenge or reinforce national mythologies, regional identity, or historical periodization? We welcome proposals by artists and art historians working in a variety of fields and time periods in order to encourage dialogue that addresses the physical and metaphorical qualities of water and its relationship to representation.

Proposals (200 word maximum) should be submitted online at http://www.secollegeart.org/conference#papers by the April 20th deadline. Please send CVs directly to Laura Igoe at ltigoe@princeton.edu.

Information about SECAC, abstract guidelines and submission procedures available at: http://www.secollegeart.org/conference

 

Call for Chapter Proposals for “Literature and Ecofeminism” – April 1, 2015 Deadline

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited volume on ecofeminist literary criticism titled “Literature and Ecofeminism.” Contributions covering a range of literary forms from diverse cultures and national traditions are welcome. Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract, 200-word biography, and sample of a previously published chapter or article to dvakoch@ciis.edu by April 1, 2015. Proposers will be notified about whether their submissions are accepted for the book by April 15, 2015. For accepted proposals first drafts of full chapters (8,000 – 9,000 words) are due by September 1, 2015, and final versions are due November 1, 2015.

Confirmed contributors to “Literature and Ecofeminism” include:

  • Izabel F. O. Brandão, Federal University of Alagoas, Brazil (The Corporeal Black Venus: Masked Bodies in Two Poems by Grace Nichols and Jackie May)
  • Theresa L. Burriss, Radford University, USA (Contemporary Appalachian Novelists with Ecofeminist Sensibilities: Ann Pancake, Dot Jackson, and Amy Green)
  • Deirdre Byne, University of South Africa, South Africa (Words as Healing: The Poetry of Malika Ndlovu)
  • Anja Höing, University of Osnabrück, Germany (Perpetuating Patriarchal Myths in Animal Stories)
  • Peter I-min Huang, Tamkang University, Taiwan (A Material Ecofeminist Reading of Linda Hogan’s “Indios” and Taiwan’s “Mazu”)
  • Lesley Kordecki, DePaul University, USA (“Like a creature native”: Ophelia’s Death and Ecofeminism)
  • Patrick Murphy, University of Central Florida, USA (Introduction)
  • Yaisna Rajkumari, Stella Maris College, India (An Ecofeminist Reading of Terry Tempest Williams’ Works)
  • Etienne Terblanche, North West University, South Africa (Transcending Sexism and Adumbrating Global Warming in 1922: T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land”)
  • Julia Tofantšuk, Tallinn University, Estonia (Intersections of Ecofeminist Philosophy and Issues of Identity, with a Focus on Sylvia Townsend Warner’s “Lolly Willows” and “Mr Fortune’s Maggot”)

The editor of “Literature and Ecofeminism,” D. A. Vakoch, is general editor of Lexington Books’ Ecocritical Theory and Practice Series. Vakoch’s earlier edited books include “Ecofeminism and Rhetoric: Critical Perspectives on Sex, Technology, and Discourse” (2011) and “Feminist Ecocriticism: Environment, Women, and Literature” (2012).

Call for Book Chapters: Ecofeminist Intersections

When d’Eaubonne coined the word “ecofeminism” in 1974, related ideas were already being discussed in a range of social sciences and humanities. Within anthropology Ortner (1974) argued that the universal devaluation of women relative to men could be explained by assuming that women are seen as being closer to nature than men, while men are seen as being more intimately connected with the “higher” realm of culture. Other disciplines seriously engaged the connections between feminism and ecology only later. It was not until the 1990s, for instance, that literary critics began to examine in depth “‘the woman/nature analogy,’ defined by Warren as ‘the connections—historical, empirical, conceptual, theoretical, symbolic, and experiential—between the domination of women and the domination of nature’” (Carr 2000, 16).

In recent years, ecofeminism has played an increasingly important role in a range of disciplines. This new book project, “Ecofeminist Intersections,” explores the manifold ways that ecofeminism has been used across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including but not limited to such fields as history, philosophy, religious studies, women’s studies, literary criticism, anthropology, sociology, psychology, economics, geography, and political science.

We invite proposals for chapters that explicitly address the intersections between ecofeminism and other approaches or perspectives (for example, posthumanism, postcolonial studies, or queer studies). We especially encourage authors to highlight the unique contributions that ecofeminism, in combination with other approaches, brings to their primary discipline.

Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract, 200-word biography, and sample of a previously published chapter or article to dvakoch@ciis.edu by March 1, 2015. First drafts of full chapters (6000 words) are due by September 1, 2015, and final versions are due November 1, 2015.

“Ecofeminist Intersections” will be guided by Quinby’s (1990, 126) observation that “Like the ecology and feminist movements from which it derives, ecofeminism is not devoid of impulses to develop a ‘coherent’ theory.” And yet, Quinby argues, coherence is limited in the face of modern power relations through which domination occurs. By Quinby’s (1990, 123) analysis, ecofeminism is most effective in opposing the oppressions of modern power by fostering a range of practices and theories: “Against such power, coherence in theory and centralization of practice make a social movement irrelevant or, worse, vulnerable, or—even more dangerous—participatory with the forces of domination.” Contrary to this pull toward uniformity, “Ecofeminist Intersections” will explore the variety of ecofeminisms that have developed over the past forty years.

The editor of “Ecofeminist Intersections,” D. A. Vakoch, is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies, as well as general editor of Lexington Books’ Ecocritical Theory and Practice Series. Vakoch’s earlier edited books include “Ecofeminism and Rhetoric: Critical Perspectives on Sex, Technology, and Discourse” (2011), “Feminist Ecocriticism: Environment, Women, and Literature” (2012), and (with F. Castrillón) “Ecopsychology, Phenomenology, and the Environment: The Experience of Nature” (2014).

 

 

Animals in the Anthropocene: Human–animal relations in a changing semiosphere – Second CFP – Due March 1, 2015

The international conference “Animals in the Anthropocene” will be held at University of Stavanger September 17-19th 2015. Accepted theme sessions are listed below. Abstracts are due March 1st 2015.

Most but not all of current environmental change is anthropogenic. The term the Anthropocene (the era of humankind) is increasingly acknowledged as suitable for our current geological epoch. As the environment undergoes change, the living conditions of animals change, and people’s perception of animals change. The dynamics of these processes are complex, and call for scholarly study from many angles. We welcome submissions with paleontological, archaeological, historical, contemporary and future-oriented perspectives. Submissions may present local or global case studies, or consist of theoretical/methodological contributions. Relevant fields of study are listed in the Call For Papers, along with a more detailed description of the conference theme. (Contact: anthropoceneanimals@uis.no.)

 

ALECC CONFERENCE 2014:
Culture, Justice, and Environment

Wednesday, August 6th – Sunday, August 10th at Lakehead University, Thunder Bay

In his provocative book Slow Violence (2011), literary scholar Rob Nixon argues that new vocabularies, images, and narrative modes and figures must emerge in order to adequately describe and respond to environmental violence and injustice, such as the loss of livelihoods due to deforestation, poisoned waterways, or climate change… (read more)

 

Call for Book Chapters:
Ecofeminist Intersections

When d’Eaubonne coined the word “ecofeminism” in 1974, related ideas were already being discussed in a range of social sciences and humanities. Within anthropology Ortner (1974) argued that the universal devaluation of women relative to men could be explained by assuming that women are seen as being closer to nature than men, while men are seen as being more intimately connected with the “higher” realm of culture. Other disciplines seriously engaged the connections between feminism and ecology only later. It was not until the 1990s, for instance, that literary critics began to examine in depth “‘the woman/nature analogy,’ defined by Warren as ‘the connections—historical, empirical, conceptual, theoretical, symbolic, and experiential—between the domination of women and the domination of nature’” (Carr 2000, 16).

In recent years, ecofeminism has played an increasingly important role in a range of disciplines. This new book project, “Ecofeminist Intersections,” explores the manifold ways that ecofeminism has been used across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including but not limited to such fields as history, philosophy, religious studies, women’s studies, literary criticism, anthropology, sociology, psychology, economics, geography, and political science.

We invite proposals for chapters that explicitly address the intersections between ecofeminism and other approaches or perspectives (for example, posthumanism, postcolonial studies, or queer studies). We especially encourage authors to highlight the unique contributions that ecofeminism, in combination with other approaches, brings to their primary discipline.

Interested authors should send a 300-word abstract, 200-word biography, and sample of a previously published chapter or article to dvakoch@ciis.edu by March 1, 2015. First drafts of full chapters (6000 words) are due by September 1, 2015, and final versions are due November 1, 2015.

“Ecofeminist Intersections” will be guided by Quinby’s (1990, 126) observation that “Like the ecology and feminist movements from which it derives, ecofeminism is not devoid of impulses to develop a ‘coherent’ theory.” And yet, Quinby argues, coherence is limited in the face of modern power relations through which domination occurs. By Quinby’s (1990, 123) analysis, ecofeminism is most effective in opposing the oppressions of modern power by fostering a range of practices and theories: “Against such power, coherence in theory and centralization of practice make a social movement irrelevant or, worse, vulnerable, or—even more dangerous—participatory with the forces of domination.” Contrary to this pull toward uniformity, “Ecofeminist Intersections” will explore the variety of ecofeminisms that have developed over the past forty years.

The editor of “Ecofeminist Intersections,” D. A. Vakoch, is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies, as well as general editor of Lexington Books’ Ecocritical Theory and Practice Series. Vakoch’s earlier edited books include “Ecofeminism and Rhetoric: Critical Perspectives on Sex, Technology, and Discourse” (2011), “Feminist Ecocriticism: Environment, Women, and Literature” (2012), and (with F. Castrillón) “Ecopsychology, Phenomenology, and the Environment: The Experience of Nature” (2014).

 

Call for Panels, Papers and Presentations

Association for Literature, Environment, and Culture in Canada (ALECC)
Biennial Conference
August 7 – 10, 2014
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay campus
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Proposals must be submitted by October 10, 2013 to alecc2014@lakeheadu.ca.
Culture, Justice, and Environment

“I want to propose a more radical notion of displacement, one that,instead of referring solely to the movement of people from their placesof belonging, refers rather to the loss of the land and resources beneath them.”

– Rob Nixon, Slow Violence

2014 Call for Papers – English
2014 Appel à propositions – Francais

Call for Paper Proposals

Ecocriticism session (co-sponsored by ASLE)
PAMLA Conference, October 31-November 2, 2014
Riverside Convention Center, Riverside, California
Presiding Officer: Kevin Hutchings, University of Northern British Columbia (hutchink@unbc.ca)

Papers are sought for a special session investigating any aspect of ecocriticism, including (but not limited to) ecocritical theory, environmental ethics, environmental justice, colonial and postcolonial ecologies, gender and ecology, literary representations of non-human being, and interdisciplinary investigations of literature and environmental science.

Paper proposals of approximately 500 words and a 50-word abstract, due by midnight on May 15, 2014, must be submitted via PAMLA’s Online Proposal Submission Form available at http://www.pamla.org/2014/proposals.